Panabas

Bascially a weaponized agricultural tool - the extra long handle and shorter, single edged cutting blade makes it a supremely versatile sword - and its name means tool for shaving off. Understatement of the year.! Because as you will see in this hands on review, this thing does more than just shave off. I think what drew me to the Panabas sword in the first place was how unique it was compared to other Asian and European swords I am used to handling.

In all respects, this is truly quite an impressive and very practical design. For a start, it had an extremely practical 'locking' mechanism on the scabbard, which was a simple metal clip that served the dual function of clipping the scabbard to a belt and ensuring the blade does not fall out when going about ones duties. But it also serves the purpose of ensuring no one can easily pull it out suddenly and use it against you before you can react.

The scabbard itself is quite beautiful in its own right, with detailed and symbolic hand etched carvings, and is reinforced with rivets and strategically placed, super tight rattan bindings. Indeed, the scabbard, which weighs close to a pound, is so substantial that it feels like it could be a weapon in its own right - and grasping the tip and striking with it would produce quite a stunning blow that could easily be followed up with a flash of the blade itself.

With a length of just over 20", the blade of the Panabas sword is not particularily long.

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But boy oh boy, just one look at it lets you know it means business. Forged from Spring Steel and tempered to a HRC of approx like all their Filipino blades - it is one solid feeling length of steel. Too short and stiff to be flex tested, it is immediately apparent that it has two primary cutting areas - the broadest edge of the blade, and the tip, which is extremely long, pointed and capable of rather frighteningly effective stabbing thrusts.

The edge is decently honed - not the sharpest blade I have handled, but quite serviceable and with a nice edge, smooth edge profile that could easily be touched up to razor sharp if so desired. The finish is very smooth with a satin polish and it is clear that a lot of hard work has gone into producing it. The 14" wooden handle is made from the same materials as the scabbard, with a steel guard, blade collar, rattan wrap and carved wooden hilt.

It cannot be taken apart to see exactly how it is assembled, but you can see a single metal peg which firmly secures the hilt to the blade which runs inside the handle. It feels extremely solid - there are no wiggles or rattles whatsoever. The hilt flares towards the termination point, and is shaped in such a way that it molds to the contours of your hand, ensuring effortless blade alignment. The Panabas sword reminds me a lot of a short hafted polearm - and at just 1.

I am not familiar with the traditional techniques for this blade - but below is a quick video showing some basic strikes and how easily it flows from one handed to two handed use. Casual handling suggested it could be used in more ways and at more ranges than just about any other sword I have seen.Since Sign In. Your Account. View Cart. However, couriers and the postal service are running beyond maximum capacity, so shipping delays are largely to be expected for the time being.

Add To Wish List. Traditionally used as an agricultural tool by the 19th century Moro tribes of Mindanao, the Panabas is a single-edged sword and is shaped like a long-handled Kukri.

Its overall length could range from feet. It is efficient at cutting in half; in fact it had a place in the battlefields against invaders. The Panabas can be used either as a single-handed or double-handed implement. How to Use Designed for true martial arts applications, brush clearing or display. Blade Length: Mahogany Wood Handle and Scabbard. Premium Quality Construction. Click here for additional information on shipping. Click here for detailed warranty information.

Satisfaction Guaranteed. We proudly stand behind every product we sell. If you are not absolutely pleased with your purchase you can return it to us within 30 days of purchase in original condition for your choice of an exchange or refund excluding shipping fees. Click here for more info on our guarantees. Sign up to receive special offers and promotions.

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We keep track of all our first line customers so that we know exactly what we sold and to whom. For your protection, we at BCI verify each blade received for exchange or return.

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Our pictures carry water marks. Please be careful of false claims and blade imitations. Handmade swords, knives and traditional weapons produced by BCI are superior in workmanship and are unquestionably at par with world standards of blade making. In the early nineties, with the production of Katana or Japanese samurai swords, BCI earned international recognition. BCI supplies retailers in the U. A, Germany, France, and Singapore. BCI is not limited to the manufacture and crafting of published line of swords, knives, or cutlery.

BCI has recently established a distribution center in the United States. To order, go to www. All our swords are handcrafted from steel with carbon content. The common steel is the high carbon steel. Oftentimes the is blended with D2 steel. Consisting of carbon, silicon and chromium, tools made of blended steel are of excellent quality.

Blade Culture blends different kinds of steel depending on availability. Our blades are tempered with a proprietary technique of tempering applications, controlled in its hardness according to the purpose and usage of each blade design. We have various techniques in tempering but the common methods are the differential or selective and spring tempering flexible.

panabas

Note that the supply determines the type of tempering employed- Selective same as Japanese tempering where blade hardens on the edge from rc. In this case, we temper at around 59 rc, then softens to the back for about rc; or Spring similar to European sword or double bladed swords tempered to a range of 48 rc to 56 rc as required depending on the type of weapon for flexibility and durability.

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Blended steel blades can be hardened by air, water and oil. What we get are fatigue-resistant types of steel, which are great as multi tasking tools. Because of the range in hardness, we do not give exact figures so as not to mislead customers but the Filipino blades are at rc, just like the Japanese katanas.

We have 3 types of tang: the rat tang, full tang and chiseled tang like that of the katanas.The Panabas is a large, forward-curved sword, used by certain ethnic groups in the southern Philippines.

It can range in size from 2 to 4 feet and can be held with one or both hands, delivering a deep, meat cleaver-like cut.

panabas

Occasional use as an agricultural and butchering tool has also been noted. The sword's name is a shortening of the word " pang-tabas ", which means "chopping tool". As such, its etymological origins are the root word tabas "to chop off" and the prefix pang "used for". A Lumad panabas. Easily one of the most recognizable among Filipino blade weapons, the Panabas is distinguished by its size and its unique, forward-curving profile.

At 2 to 4 feet, it is among the largest of Filipino swords, with only some Kampilan specimens being longer. The forward-curved shape of its blade makes it unique not only in terms of its appearance, but in terms of handling as well.

In terms of shape, similarities have been noted between the Panabas and the Nepalese Kukri knife, although the Kukri is, of course, much smaller. Its hilt is perhaps the longest among Filipino swords, both in terms of overall length, and in terms of proportion relative to the blade. Seen from the side, the Panabas' laminated steel blade is single-edged, is narrowest near the hilt, and gets dramatically thicker near the tip, where the edge side of the weapon curves forward.

Because the Panabas is primarily used in a chopping rather than thrusting motion, the shape of the actual tip varies greatly, with some specimens coming to a blunt tip, some pointed in the manner of other Filipino swords such as the Dahong Palayand some taking on a square or diamond shape, with the furthest tip of the diamond, on the blunt back of the sword, serving as an elementary spike.

The panabas' hilt, made of hardwood such as Narra and often wrapped in braided rattanis perhaps the longest among Filipino swords, both in terms of overall length, and in terms of proportion relative to the blade. The hilts of some specimens are wrapped in metal bands rather than rattan. Panabas scabbards were made of plain wood and are now extremely rare - according to accounts, largely because warriors would frequently discard them prior to a battle.

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Such scabbards invariably consist of two pieces of wood which are taken apart to remove the sword, as opposed to the sheath-type scabbards used by most other swords. The weapons are also said to have been carried into battle wrapped in cloth and slung across the back. While the Panabas is now rare and there are thus no contemporary cases of its use in battle, stories from and prior to the American colonial era describe it as being used for mop-up operations.

It is said that warriors wielding Panabas would form a rear guard and, following in the steps of warriors in front, use the panabas to quickly dispatch any survivors. Because of its effectiveness at chopping through meat, Panabas was known favored for use in executions. As such, the panabas also came to symbolize a datu's power - a demonstration of his ability to control violence. The function of the Panabas is really that of a large cleaver, and this shapes the domestic use of the Panabas as much as it shapes the martial use.

The noted use of the panabas as an execution tool sprang from its initial domestic use for cleaving meat and fish, easily chopping through the large tuna that are caught in the seas of the Southern Philippines. However, its main domestic use is that of clearing unusually dense vegetation.

Used as a broader term, the word panabas means "a chopper" - a description which would include the many machete-like sword variants in the Philippines, and, perhaps more notably, the sickle. In portions of the Philippines where the Panabas is not used, the term panabas is used to refer to the sickle, whose proper name is "karit.

A weaponized version of the agricultural scythe would be the Indonesian kerambit. The Panabas is one of many bladed weapons portrayed in the " Weapons of Moroland " plaque that has become a common souvenir item and pop culture icon in the Philippines.

Sign In Don't have an account? Contents [ show ].The panabasalso known as nawiis a large, forward-curved sword or battle axe used by certain ethnic groups in the southern Philippines. It can range in size from 2 to 4 feet and can be held with one or both hands, delivering a deep, meat cleaver-like cut. Occasional use as an agricultural and butchering tool has also been noted. The sword's name is a shortening of the word " pang-tabas ", which means "chopping tool".

As such, its etymological origins are the root word tabas "to chop off" and the prefix pang "used for". The panabas is one of many bladed weapons portrayed in the " Weapons of Moroland " plaque that has become a common souvenir item and pop culture icon in the Philippines. Easily one of the most recognizable among Filipino blade weapons, the panabas is distinguished by its size and its unique, forward-curving profile. At 2 to 4 feet, it is among the largest of Filipino swords, with only some Kampilan specimens being longer.

The forward-curved shape of its blade makes it unique not only in terms of its appearance, but in terms of handling as well. In terms of shape, similarities have been noted between the panabas and the Nepalese kukri knife, although the kukri is much smaller. Its hilt is perhaps the longest among Filipino swords, both in terms of overall length, and in terms of proportion relative to the blade.

Seen from the side, the panabas's laminated steel blade is single-edged, is narrowest near the hilt, and gets dramatically thicker near the tip, where the edge side of the weapon curves forward. Because the panabas is primarily used in a chopping rather than thrusting motion, the shape of the actual tip varies greatly, with some specimens coming to a blunt tip, some pointed in the manner of other Filipino swords such as the Dahong Palayand some taking on a square or diamond shape, with the furthest tip of the diamond, on the blunt back of the sword, serving as an elementary spike.

There are rare panabas specimens that have an 'S'-shaped blade sharpened partially along the backside, such that the specimen is double edged at the tip. While design work on the panabas's blade is relatively rare, among the most common examples of decorative design elements take the form of talismanic 'X' along the spine. The panabas' hilt, made of hardwood such as narra and often wrapped in braided rattanis perhaps the longest among Filipino swords, both in terms of overall length, and in terms of proportion relative to the blade.

panabas

The hilts of some specimens are wrapped in metal bands rather than rattan. Panabas scabbards were made of plain wood and are now extremely rare - according to accounts, largely because warriors would frequently discard them prior to a battle. Such scabbards invariably consist of two pieces of wood which are taken apart to remove the sword, as opposed to the sheath-type scabbards used by most other swords. The weapons are also said to have been carried into battle wrapped in cloth and slung across the back.

While the panabas is now rare and there are thus no contemporary cases of its use in battle, stories from and prior to the American colonial era describe it as being used for mop-up operations.

It is said that warriors wielding panabas would form a rear guard and, following in the steps of warriors in front, use the panabas to quickly dispatch any survivors. Because of its effectiveness at chopping through meat, panabas was known favored for use in executions. As such, the panabas also came to symbolize a datu 's power - a demonstration of his ability to control violence.These TFW Edged Weapons are hand forged of the highest quality blade steel of any Filipino weapons sold anywhere — and at great value for the dollar!

Note that these heirloom quality blades are NOT made of re-melted spring steel that was stamped out and mass produced by computerized machines as other companies are selling. This is an all-in-one view for people who did not know we have training knives, [ I am interviewed there for [ I think you folks will find this to be quite interesting.

Panabas/Tabas/ Pantabas

If by chance you folks are interested, check out this interview from the Ukraine to [ Why is it that we train in so hard in martial arts, whether it be [ Now this is based on knowledge I have acquired during my various Philippine trips over [ The Moro Barong is one of the weapons of certain Kuntao styles in the Philippines.

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